About the Alianza

ALIANZA NEWS AND EVENTS 2001
Donate to us
Programs & Projects
 
Latino Men and Women Seek Alternative Solutions To Ending Domestic Violence In Latino Communities During First Joint National Forum
Board & Staff
Resources
Domestic Violence Affects Families of All Racial, Ethnic, and Economic Backgrounds
News & Events
Early Census Reports Show Soaring Latino Population: Expected to Become the Largest Minority Group in the United States
  2003
2002

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
DATE: April 10, 2001

[PSA: 30-second spot]

Is the imprisonment of thousands of Latino men and women really the answer to ending domestic violence in the community? The National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence (Alianza) will look at cultural approaches to solving problems of domestic violence during a two-day national conference entitled, Forum on Latinos Who Batter: Hope for Those Who Hurt Others. The Forum will be held April 27 and 28 at the Sheraton Pasadena Hotel. Alianza is sponsoring the Forum in partnership with the National Compadres Network and with the support of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Alianza believes that criminal prosecution alone is not an adequate means of addressing the root causes of domestic violenceÑparticularly in communities of color. The first day of the Forum will be limited to a group of 40 domestic violence service providers, researchers, policy analysts and advocates. Activities for the second day, which begin at 8:30 a.m. and end at 5 p.m., will be open to the public. A closing reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. The Sheraton Pasadena Hotel is located at 303 East Cordova Street in Pasadena, California. For more information contact Ricardo Carrillo at (510) 885-0272 or (415) 310-6011.         To top

  2001
Jobs
Did you know?
Voices of Survivors
Links
Join us!
Contact us
Spanish Version
Home
 

[PSA: 15-second spot]

Too many prison cells are being occupied by Latino men and women charged with crimes of domestic violence. The National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence (Alianza) believes that criminal prosecution alone is not an adequate means of addressing the root causes of domestic violence. The issue will be examined during a two-day national conference entitled, Forum on Latinos Who Batter: Hope for Those Who Hurt Others, which will be held April 27 and 28 at the Sheraton Pasadena Hotel, located at 303 East Cordova Street in Pasadena, California. Alianza is sponsoring the Forum in partnership with the National Compadres Network and with the support of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Activities for the second day of the Forum are open to the public. For more information contact Ricardo Carrillo at (510) 885-0272 or (415) 310-6011.                                                                To top

Domestic Violence Affects Families of All Racial, Ethnic, and Economic Backgrounds
It is a Widespread and Destructive Problem in Latino Communities

While domestic violence is a crime whose victims are largely women and children, it is regarded as a substantial public health problem with multiple and serious consequences and costs for entire families and communities, regardless of ethnic, racial, or economic backgrounds.

* Nearly 1 in 3 adult women experience physical assault by a partner during adulthood. The rates of domestic violence are consistent across racial and ethnic groups.

* However, the U.S. Department of Justice has noted a significant link between poverty and an increased incidence of domestic violence. Domestic violence rates are 5 times higher among families below poverty levels, and severe spousal abuse is twice as likely to be committed by unemployed men as by those working full time.

* Estimated medical expenses from domestic violence total between $3 and $5 billion annually; businesses forfeit another $100 million in lost wages, sick leave, absenteeism, and non-productivityÑabout 25% of workplace problems can be attributed to family violence.

* Domestic Violence is a major cause of family homelessness. As many as half of all women and children become homeless because of domestic violence.

* The overlap between domestic violence and child abuse is well documented. A 1995 Gallup Poll of family violence found that from 1.5 million to 3.3 million children witness parental domestic violence each year. National research reveals that 75 percent of battered women report their children are also battered.

* Women age 19 to 29, and women in families with incomes below $10,000 were more likely than other women to be victims of violence by an intimate.

* Relationship abuse among teenagers is one of the fastest growing types of violence in our nation. Estimates indicate that as many as one-third of all high school and college students experience violence in an intimate or dating relationship. One study found that 30% of young women, (between the ages of 15-19) murdered each year, are killed by their boyfriends or husbands.

* Domestic violence within Latino families happens in the context of a community suffering from a legacy of multiple oppressions, some of which go back for centuries--poverty (both here and in their countries of origin), long-term discrimination, racism, and colonization. Because of this legacy of disempowerment, Latinos in the United States have not been able to promote their interests effectively in the legislative, legal, and funding arenas. They have also been hampered in their ability to develop adequate prevention, intervention, and treatment services that are culturally and linguistically competent and that take into consideration the strong orientation toward family and community that is predominant in the Latino culture.

* The most recent approaches to domestic violence research and intervention strategies in Latino and other racial/ethnic communities are beginning to shift their focus from the individual problem of the abused woman (or even batterer) to a community problem that affects, and is affected by many elements in the environment in which it occurs.

* Cultural specific batterer intervention programs for Latinos are being developed within the context of a comprehensive family intervention approach. These programs view domestic violence as a social malaise that is allowed to occur and play itself out in many families, and assert that, in a majority of cases, the abuse of men against women is a behavior that many males have learned at home and in a society in which violence is an accepted way of resolving differences.

* A survey conducted by the Immigrant Women's Task Force of the Northern California Coalition for Immigrant Rights revealed that 34% of Latinas surveyed had experienced domestic violence either in their country of origin, in the U.S. or in both.

* Several factors including discrimination and lack of bilingual/bicultural staff, have led to an under utilization of shelters and other domestic violence services by Latinas(os) affected by domestic violence. One study of undocumented immigrants found that for 64% of Latinas, a primary barrier to seeking help from social service agencies is the fear of deportation.

* Children who witness domestic violence suffer poor health, low self-esteem, are at high risk of alcohol and drug use, sexual acting out, running away from home, and suicide.

* One study of migrant and seasonal farm worker families found that children exposed to domestic violence were four times more likely to carry weapons than children not exposed to violence.                                             To top

Early Census Reports Show Soaring Latino Population:
Expected to Become the Largest Minority Group in the United States
 

  • Latinos are the fastest growing minority group in the United States, soaring from 22 million to 35.3 million in the last 10 years (an increase of more than 60 percent). Earlier census reports had projected Hispanics would become the country's largest minority by the year 2005. In contrast, the number of blacks (African Americans) rose by about 16 percent (from 30 million to 34.7 million) during this same period.
  • While Hispanics are still concentrated in the Southwest, California, Florida, and New York, new immigrants from Mexico and Central America (and a smaller, but growing number from the Caribbean and South America) have moved to states like North Carolina, Georgia, and Iowa, where the Hispanic population was almost non-existent a decade ago.
  • The Latino population in the United States is a complex group. On the one hand, Latino communities share certain traits and hold in common certain basic cultural values, and on the other hand they are very diverse, with the degree of acculturation and traditions varying noticeably among the subgroups. Some Latinos have adapted to the majority culture, adopting its language, customs, and values, while others still live in ethnically monolithic communities whose values and norms closely resemble those of their country of origin.
  • Despite the impending shift in the racial/ethnic composition of the country, there is still the tendency by public and private research groups and agencies to limit research, data collection, and societal attention to a Black/White dichotomy, ignoring the increasing complexity of diversity issues in the U.S.
Back to top


©2003. National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence. All Rights Reserved.

Alianza information: information@dvalianza.org
      Webmaster/Developer: Monica Roman     Designer: Virginia Rosario