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Annotated Bibliography

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Neff, J.A., Holamon, B., & Schluter, T.D. (1995). "Spousal Violence among Anglos, Blacks, and Mexican Americans: The Role of Demographic Variables, Psychosocial Predictors, and Alcohol Consumption." Journal of Family Violence, 10(1), 1-21.
Language: English

Racial and ethnic differences in the prevalence and correlates of self-reported spousal violence in a community sample of Anglo, Black, and Mexican American adults are examined. Females, the formerly married and Black females in particular (up to 60% of formerly married) were most likely to report being beaten by and beating a spouse. Multivariate analyses controlling for demographic variables, financial stress, social desirability, sex role traditionalism and drinking quantity (and spouse's drinking among the currently married) did not eliminate the greater likelihood of reports of both beating and being beaten among married Black females. There was little consistent evidence to suggest greater propensity among Mexican American than Anglo respondents. The findings raise questions about simplistic socioeconomic status or financial stress explanations of observed racial/ethnic differences in spousal violence. Further, curvilinear effects of alcohol quantity and spouse drinking upon reported violence question simple "disinhibition" arguments and suggest the need for data regarding couple dynamics.

Nieves-Rosa, L. E., Carballo-Diéguez, A., & Dolezal, C. (2000). "Domestic abuse and HIV-Risk behavior in Latin American men who have sex with men in New York City." Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 11(1), 77-90.
Language: English

The results of this study, conducted with 273 Latin American men who have sex with men living in the New York metro area, show that 54% of the men reported having experienced domestic abuse at least once in their relationships. Up to 12% of these men had been forced to have receptive anal sex without condoms by one of their partners since 1981. 33% of respondents reported having experienced verbal and psychological abuse, and 35% reported physical (but not sexual) abuse perpetrated by one of their partners. Correlations were found between physical and sexual victimization and practicing receptive anal sex without condoms. Strong relations were also found between childhood sexual abuse, using recreational drugs, low self-esteem and self-worth and domestic abuse in intimate adult relationships.

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

For help please call:

The National
Domestic Violence Hotline:

1-800-799-7233 (SAFE)

The New York State Spanish Domestic Violence Hotline:

Español:
1-800-942-6908

English:
1-800-942-6906

 
   

©2006. National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence.
All Rights Reserved. Last updated 10/20/06