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Annotated Bibliography

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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Taggart, L. & Mattson, S. (1996). "Delay in prenatal care as a result of battering in pregnancy: Cross-cultural implications." Health Care of Women International, 17(1), 25-34.
Language: English

White, Hispanic and African American women were surveyed in public health and low-income clinics in Los Angeles, CA and Seattle, WA, to determine if they delayed seeking prenatal care because of battering during their pregnancies. Results from 162 White, 208 Hispanic and 132 African American participants revealed that the incidence of abuse was not significantly different among ethnic groups. Battered women sought prenatal care 6.5 weeks later than the nonabused sample, with a similar delay in each ethnic group. 21% reported physical harm during pregnancy, and 13.7% stated they had delayed care because of injuries.

Tello, J. (1998). "El Hombre Noble Buscando Balance: The Noble Man Searching for Balance." In R. Carrillo & J. Tello (Eds.), Family Violence and Men of Color: Healing the Wounded Male Spirit (pp. 31-52). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.
Language: English

Proposes a culturally competent model for working with Latino men that incorporates storytelling and ancient cultural practices, and that rebalances the effects of colonization, racism and discrimination, particularly internalized oppression.

Toro-Alfonso, J. (1999). "Domestic violence among same sex partners in Puerto Rico: Implications for HIV intervention." Journal of Gay & Lesbian Social Services, 9(1), 69-78.
Language: English

Review of the literature shows that prevalence rates in same sex domestic violence reflects that of the general population. 152 gay men and lesbians in Puerto Rico answered a survey on domestic violence. 7-13% of participants reported at least one instance of physical abuse in their relationship. Close to half of the respondents reported frequent instances of verbal and emotional abuse. The author points out the importance of this issue to the potential transmission of HIV among gay males.

Torres, S. (1998). "Intervening with Battered Hispanic Pregnant Women." In J.C. Campbell, Empowering Survivors of Abuse: Health Care for Battered Women and their Children (pp. 259-270). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Language: English

Culturally specific interventions that target Hispanic women are needed if we are to effectively combat the problem of woman abuse in this population. The role that culture plays in battered Hispanic women's access to health care services and the provision of services must be more clearly understood. The ways that different cultures view health and illness are frequently unknown to health care providers of other cultural backgrounds. Cultures also have their own ways of viewing pregnancy, their own definition of woman abuse, and their own mechanisms for coping with the problem of abuse. Health care professionals should make efforts to learn to provide quality care to those of all cultural groups, including Hispanic women. By delivering care in a culturally sensitive manner, the providers are best able to respond appropriately to the needs of Hispanic women. This chapter focuses on the cultural, socioeconomic, and health factors that should be considered in caring for battered Hispanic pregnant women and makes recommendations for culturally relevant interventions to respond to their needs. ((c) 1999 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

Torres, S. (1993). "Nursing care of battered Hispanic pregnant women." AWHONN’s Clinical Issues, 4(3), 416-423.
Language: English

This article describes nursing care of low-income, battered Hispanic pregnant women within the context of the Hispanic culture and discusses clinical and nursing implications for interventions.

Torres, S. (1991). "A Comparison of Wife Abuse between Two Cultures: Perceptions, Attitudes, Nature, and Extent." Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 12, 113-131.
Language: English

Explored similarities and differences between 25 Anglo-American and 25 Mexican-American women, over age 18 years, who had been physically abused by their husbands at least two times and had resided in shelters for battered women. Subjects were matched for age and socioeconomic status (SES). Data were collected via a semistructured interview schedule consisting of three instruments. Results show more similarities than differences in the manifestation of wife abuse between the two groups. However, Anglo-American women perceived more types of behavior as being abusive and exhibited a less tolerant attitude toward wife abuse than did Mexican-American women. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved).

Torres, S. (1987). "Hispanic-American Battered Women: Why Consider Cultural Differences?" Response to the Victimization of Women and Children, 10(3), 20-21.
Language: English

Interviewed 25 Hispanic-American and 25 Anglo-American women residing in shelters for battered women on their attitudes toward wife abuse; their perception of wife abuse; the nature, severity, and frequency of abuse; and their response to the abuse. Data show similarities among the women, but there were differences. Implications for treatment and other interventions are discussed. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved)

Trinch, S. L. (2001). "The advocate as gatekeepers: The limits of politeness in protective order interviews with Latina survivors of domestic abuse." Journal of Sociolinguistics, 5 (4), 475-506.
Language: English

This article examines how interviewers linguistically create and manage their identities as institutional gatekeepers for their agencies and institutional advocates for their clients in protective order application interviews. Thirty protective order interviews were conducted at a district attorney’s office or at a pro bono law office. Analysis of the verbal interaction between protective order application interviewers and their Latina clients investigates what positive politeness strategies can reveal about how interviewers allow clients to give their accounts of abuse. Additionally, what interviewers say to clients as well as how interviewers allow clients to give their accounts of abuse is examined

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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

 

 

For help please call:

The National
Domestic Violence Hotline:

1-800-799-7233 (SAFE)

The New York State Spanish Domestic Violence Hotline:

Español:
1-800-942-6908

English:
1-800-942-6906

 
   

©2006. National Latino Alliance for the Elimination of Domestic Violence.
All Rights Reserved. Last updated 10/20/06